Tag Archives: Research Assistant

What does a summer job in hydrology entail? Meet Janelle Laing…

FaceShot_JanelleJanelle, an Environmental Science student at the University of Winnipeg, joined the WSRP in the summer of 2015 as an Ecohydrology Research Assistant to explore whether plants are preferentially utilizing tightly-bound water over free flowing water in various settings. Within a short period of time, Janelle learned a great combination of laboratory and field sampling techniques with the luxury of having her field sites within walking distance. Of course, Janelle also learned that as with any field-based project, one should always expect the unexpected as unforeseen situations may arise that are beyond control (e.g., “unforecasted” rainfall events, malfunctioning equipment and so on). Although frustrating at times, her struggles to sample appropriately sized and aged twigs from trees remains one of Janelle’s more memorable times when reflecting upon her first summer with the WSRP. And like many others, Janelle has appreciated the opportunities to work outdoors and with others in the group. Janelle’s work has continued throughout her studies into 2016 as she used the data collected during her summer work for her Honor’s Thesis.

Interview done and profile written by Jonathon Belanger

What does a summer job in hydrology entail? Meet Laura Blunden…

FaceShot_Laura1As a Hydrology and Biogeochemistry Field and Research Assistant, Laura’s summer 2015 position with the WSRP was as varied as her academic background and work interests. Laura will soon graduate with an Honors Bachelor of Science in Physical Geography, including a Minor in Biological Science, with aspirations to obtain a second degree at some point (possibly a Master’s degree or delving into Environmental Law). Either way, Laura has already proven she is a strong multi-disciplinary individual, passionate about the environment and with a drive to continue learning. A further testament to this, Laura was motivated to join the WSRP by “…the fact that the program provided training in multiple areas of research”. In a short amount of time, Laura found that she learned “Tons!” In just two months, she became familiar with different sampling techniques, filtered samples with Agriculture Canada, created maps and brochures and helped organized tours of experimental farms where hydrogeochemical research is taking place as part of the WSRP outreach. Despite having some high profile responsibilities in her work, Laura acknowledges that there are some days when you can expect to get your hands dirty: she cites having her rubber boots stuck in the mud as her most memorable (and recurring) moments. Like many others in the group, the opportunity to work outside remains a favorite aspect of working with the WSRP for Laura. And like others, leisure time is also spent outdoors camping, hiking or heading to the beach.

Interview done and profile written by Jonathon Belanger